ARTE POVERA

by Vasile Mureșan (Murivale)

ABOUT

Vasile Mureșan (Murivale)

Anyone can meet Vasile Mureșanu, Murivale, and know, today, if he arrives in Bucharest in the parking lot in the city center at the intersection between Calea Moșilor and Sfânta Vineri street. A stone’s throw from the extension of the Lipscani or the well-known central churches, St. George New, but also the Old, Corner or Stravropoleos. Given this positioning of him in space, he makes the time he spends here become meaningful, artistically meaningful. We say this because the entire parking space has been organized or re-invented to be a work of art. Murivale calls it environmental art. For this type of art it is characteristic that human intervention is seen in the environment, but not to affect its integrity, on the contrary to enhance it, to bring something of human creative genius that amplifies the beauty of the environment. It is a kind of art on the border between land-art, that is, an art that works with landscape, performance and a bit of the cult that the Impressionists had for light; for this manifestation works with what it has at hand, landscape (natural or urban), together with inserts designed by the creative artist to convey a message. This kind of manifestation characteristic of Murivale’s art can always be admired in the Parking on Calea Moșilor.

His way of intervening in space was an interesting one that can refer to the deep Romanian creative background, more precisely a reinterpretation of some Christic representations or of the Madonna, on our old Byzantine background. But, in a discussion with the artist, you realize that, in fact, the inspiration does not come from an ancestral creative bed that we all have inserted in the code of images with which we come or are accustomed by our spiritual-visual culture, not , it is about his universality as an artist and creator. Reinterpretations of Christ or the Madonna are reinterpretations by established artists of universal art revised in his art pieces from Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raffael, but especially El Greco.

Picture 1366 - 2019
Picture 1366 - 2019
Picture 1367 - 2019
Picture 1367 - 2019
Picture 1455 - 2019
Picture 1455 - 2019

There is something very deep in common that connects the art of El Greco, with that of Cornel Baba, with that of Murivale. It is as if from the hieratic figures (here, also of Byzantine sorcerers) of El Greco, Baba took over the characters that he enveloped in an aura of dark earth colors, close to the tragedy with which communism swept the spirit, to arrive now, paradoxically, we could say, to an art with the same foundation, but a strong chromatic range, especially vivid and lively. In a way you can say that, after so much pressure of a baroque art, with tendencies of self-closure and perpetuation of a tradition; after, a passage through the figures of hopeless and anxious people, where the clown is a central character in Baba’s painting, exists now, taking over from these two great masters and the second, even mentor for Murivale, a vein, a trend, but modulated on his style. Murivale’s painting on any type of medium, be it canvas, cardboard, europallet, wood, banner, asphalt, flower pots or on an entire landscape, is a living art, alive, in color and in the dynamism it releases.

In fact, very difficult to classify and classify according to classical taxonomies, Murivale can be framed both as an environmentalist artist and as an autohon representative of an “arte povera” and as an artist with universalist tendencies, but especially an experimentalist artist who tries any type novelty and environment. An intersection in style, very successful and interesting between the old schools, a deep background and a city, which needs much more beauty and art.

Dream Garden 111 - 2019
Dream Garden 111 - 2019
Picture 8760 - 2019
Picture 8760 - 2019
Dream Garden 128 - 2019
Dream Garden 128 - 2019